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propagation of new plants

I grow sweet potatoes in containers that I hang off of my deck.  I like the foliage all summer and the small purple flowers.  I grow my own slips. Here is a link to an earlier post with the starting of the sweet potato plants,  https://mygardenmychickens.wordpress.com/2013/04/29/cold-frame-potting-shed-and-bunny-rabbit/.

I have 1 large round container and 4 rectangular containers (kitty litter buckets).  To harvest I just dump them out into my wheelbarrow and pull off the potatoes.

large round container on side of deck

large round container on side of deck

4 kitty litter buckets with sweet potato plants

4 kitty litter buckets with sweet potato plants

sweet potatoes

sweet potatoes

sorry, it's a little fuzzy. sweet potato harvest 2013

sorry, it’s a little fuzzy. sweet potato harvest 2013

Not a bad harvest, some large ones and a lot more small ones.  I have them spread out  on cardboard  by the wood stove to cure before I store them in the cellar.

In my last post I wrote about pulling up my tomato plants.  I want to add, that I DO NOT compost these plants.  I bury them away from my garden.  This is to help control the tomato blight.  This blight would survive a compost season.  It probably is in the soil but I feel better not mixing it with my compost.

Ed

 

 

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I set my leeks into my garden using a newly made dibble, close to the size and shape of the seedlings  from the multi-pack.  The dibble certainly made the transplanting much easier, push it into the ground and you have a perfectly shaped hole to place the young seedling in.

Dibble and leek seedlings

Dibble and leek seedlings

This dibble is the first single one that I have tried .  I have a couple of multi-dibbles that I have used for years.  https://mygardenmychickens.wordpress.com/2013/04/18/pictures/

I set my leek seedlings in a dug out boxed area or place an open bottomed box over them.  The sides are about 6 inches high.  As the leeks grow I add compost around them till the compost is level with the top of the box.  This will give me a 6- 8 inch white leek at harvest time.

Leek seedlings planted in bottomless box

Leek seedlings planted in bottomless box

Mother nature sometimes helps with the plant selection for the garden.  I planted New Zealand spinach 4 years ago and have not planted it since. But, every year since then I have New Zealand spinach growing in my garden.  I just have to find where the small seedlings are growing and transplant them to where I want them .  I thought this year I wasn’t getting any but I found some seedlings growing in with the garlic.  When they get a little bigger, I will move 3 or 4 to their rightful spot.

Also this year Mother nature selected 6 Russian Red Kale plants and 4 dill plants to be part of the garden.  The kale was a surprise, mostly because I had decided not to plant any of the Russian this year.  Not wanting to piss-off Mother nature, I found them a spot, well 6 spots.  The dill was gratefully received since the dill I planted didn’t grow at all.

My rhubarb is very happy this year.  Bigger, taller, thicker, fuller and just lush.

Happy Rhubarb,  with fencing to keep out the chickens.

Happy Rhubarb, with fencing to keep out the chickens.

Garlic 5/22/13

Garlic 5/22/13

Peas  5/22/13

Peas 5/22/13

One last item in the garden. Actually there are 2 of them, I only got a picture of the smaller one.

Garter snake  5/25/13

Garter snake 5/25/13

Ed

A simple way to propagate new plants is a method called layering.  Forsythia plants do this every time a branch touches the ground, within an hour roots are starting to grow and a new forsythia plant is started.  I may be off on the amount of time it takes but an unattended forsythia bush soon becomes a jungle.

My pink rhododendrons are also very good at rooting new plants.  My white rhody is a little slower and my red rhody is very hard to get to root.  So my yard has a lot of pink rhodies, a fair number of white ones and just a few reds.

I have bent lower branches of dogwoods and rose of sharon down to the ground, staked them down and cover the stake with compost to propagate new plants.  The dogwoods generally root in a year and can be dug up and planted in a new location the next spring.  The rose of sharon needs more time to root.  I have done it in a year only once, failed on a couple of tries and succeeded with a year and a half to two year time frame.

I’m trying the rose of sharon again this year and my magnolia tree.  I’m not staking them this time, I think the stress of the bending is part of my failure rate.  I’m threading the branch into the side of a plastic  pot for the rose of sharon and into the side of a wooden bottomless box for the magnolias. Time will tell if this will work.

Experiment in layering a magnolia tree 5/13

Experiment in layering a magnolia tree 5/13

Rose of Sharon layering experiment 5/5/13

Rose of Sharon layering experiment 5/5/13

5/22/13  Rose of Sharon

5/22/13 Rose of Sharon

Ed

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